About subnetwork

Jonathan Davis loves network engineering. He's been in IT for over 17 years. In that time, he has worked in almost every aspect of IT. Nothing holds his attention and imagination like building wireless networks for unique environments.

MFD3 – Link-Live Updates

This is the third blog from the Company-Previously-Known-As-Netscout’s session at Mobility Field Day 3. You can read about the AirCheck G2 v3.0 update and also the LinkRunner G2 v2.0 Update.

To catch you up, I came into MFD3 less enthusiastic than most regarding Netscout and their lineup of handheld network tools. With that said, I took notice in 2017 at MFD2 that the company was paying attention to feedback and looking for suggestions on how to improve their product offerings.

One of those improvements for MFD3 was a further expansion of the capabilities of Link-Live.

Link-Live has matured into a tool for consolidating all of your test results AND managing the tools at your disposal.

Many of these updates were covered in the LinkRunner and AirCheck updates, but bear repeating:

  • AirCheck software updates
  • AirCheck G2 Profile sharing
  • Packet capture sharing
  • Simplified App search for the LinkRunner G2
  • Files Folder – There is a lot more available that can be uploaded and saved to a project folder
  • Full AutoTest results

The most significant aspect of the Link-Live updates is a clear direction to make the LinkRunner and AirCheck entirely manageable without a Windows PC. This is a substantial shift from the past, and I am very excited to see it taking place because I stay away from Windows as much as possible.

So, the ultimate question, does the updates to the AirCheck G2 and LinkRunner G2, along with the new features of Link-Live make me change my opinion? Do I now see the ROI? Would I spend my budget, either personal or business on either tool?

The answer is “yes” to all of the above. With the divestiture of the handheld tools from Netscout into its own company, I expect the future to be bright. I think we will continue to see updates, new use cases, and great support. The handheld network tools team has won me over, and I’m happy to change my previous opinion. I will acquire both tools over the coming months for my personal toolkit, as I know my employer doesn’t have the budget. I don’t think there is more to say.

MFD3 – AirCheck G2 V3.0 Announcement

aircheckg2In case you missed it, MFD3 was an opportunity to reevaluate my opinion on the Aircheck G2 and LinkRunner G2. After my experiences at MFD2, I was no longer openly hostile towards the tools and saw that there was a legitimate desire to be open, fill the needs of users, and provide regular updates with new features.

As someone who identifies explicitly as a Wireless Network Engineer, the AirCheck G2 has been on my radar for a while, so I was interested, maybe even excited, about the opportunity to see the latest updates.

The AirCheck G2 v3.0 update adds:

  • Over-the-Network firmware updates – Sadly the V3.0 software update will have to be loaded from a PC, but from that point forward, a user with an active support contract can update the device directly.
  • Over-the-Network profile sharing – If your organization has more than one AirCheck G2, you can now ensure that everyone is testing using the same profile, all over-the-air through Link-Live.
  • Improved Link-Live interaction – manage device profiles, get test results, packet captures, etc.
  • Improved Locator Tool accuracy the Locator Tool now uses all three radio chains to enhance signal strength and accuracy
  • Enhanced AP name support – can now read AP names from Aerohive, Aruba, Cisco, Extreme Networks, and Huawei
  • Improved iPerf test performance – can now test using iPerf2, up to 300Mbps
  • Improved packet capture workflow – now users can be particular regarding the type of traffic they want to capture
  • Voice VLAN on ethernet test – if there is a voice VLAN assigned to the ethernet port, it will be displayed
  • Import certificates with a thumb drive – This simplifies importing certificates and is especially crucial for wireless engineers who might work at various customer sites.
  • Static IP’s can be assigned to the ethernet port
  • Other updates, which you should watch the video to see:

 

So, have I changed my mind? Am I ready to own a LinkSprinter G2 or AirCheck G2? Well, I think we should discuss Link-Live. That definitely factors into my decision.

MFD3 – LinkRunner G2 v2.0 Update

I have an admission to make. Before Mobility Field Day 2 of 2017, I was openly hostile towards the biggest player in the handheld network tools market. Through a series of lousy blue and gold experiences, I decided I no longer had room for those tools in my budget. Even after receiving a blue and gold LinkSprinter at a WLPC, I was apathetic at best.

But, I like reexamining my strongly held opinions. I believe that admitting I am wrong is much better than holding firmly to an incorrect conclusion.

linkrunnerSo, in 2017 when Netscout presented at MFD2, I got my opportunity to reconsider. They were working to expand the capabilities of the toolset, and they were open to feedback and requests for new features. I even considered purchasing an AirCheck G2, but ultimately found that I hadn’t budgeted for it. (Shocking!)

So, let’s fast forward to 2018 and MFD3. Over the two hour window Julio Petrovitch, from the handheld network tools group previously owned by Netscout, covered many topics, but the topics of most interest were the AirCheck G2 v3.0 and the LinkRunner G2 v2.0 software updates. So again, I got to reevaluate my opinion.

The very first revelation to me was this team now truly believes in updates! The LinkRunner was released last October, so approximately a year later they are adding features with v2.0. The announcement included significant new improvements and features, not just small dot revision updates and bug fixes.

The LinkRunner G2 v2.0 update adds:

  • 802.3bt support – provides both loaded and unloaded voltage and wattage reporting of class 5-8 PoE PSE equipment
  • Injector support – measures from 12-60 volts
  • More VLAN information – the LinkRunner G2 can provide lots of information regarding the VLAN’s that are accessible from a switchport; useful if you have ports configured with a voice and data VLAN.
  • Enhanced DHCP Test – Now supports providing information from DHCP Options 43, 60, and 150.
  • Auto Test Improvements – allows a user to refine how they would like a test to run.
  • VLAN Monitor Tool – plug the LinkRunner G2 into a trunk port and monitor all of the VLAN’s that are available and the amount of traffic broadcast on each
  • Packet Captures – or as Julio Petrovitch correctly called it frame captures. Plug the device into a mirror or span port and capture traffic directly to the LinkRunner G2.

One more note; the LinkRunner G2 can charge from PoE! That isn’t a new feature, but it was one that I missed. I am mentioning it here for those others who might also be unaware.

So, the real question, have I changed my mind about Netscout? Maybe, but first, I think we should discuss the AirCheck G2.

Watch the whole presentation and then tell me what you’re most excited about in the comments.

 

MFD3 – Huge updates for AirCheck G2 and LinkRunner G2; then Netscout announces their sale

Mobility Field Day 3 was great! If you missed it, I will be releasing a few blogs over the coming weeks from my experience at the event. In the meantime, you can watch all of the videos here:

https://techfieldday.com/event/mfd3/

One of the most interesting developments this morning was the announcement from Netscout that it was divesting its handheld network test division to StoneCalibre.

The press release can be found here:
https://www.netscout.com/news/press-release/netscout-divests-handheld-network-test-business

While this announcement creates quite a few questions around the future, I firmly believe that the great group of people who have brought us the recently announced LinkRunner G2 v2.0 and AirCheck G2 v3.0 software updates are going to keep killing it. I’m excited to see what they bring to us in the future and hope to see them presenting once again at Mobility Field Day 4.

VIAVI Observer Apex- Finding the needle faster

I participated in the Tech Field Day Extra events at Cisco Live. One of the presenters, VIAVI has been floating near the edge of my awareness for a while, so it was great to see their presentation and get a better understanding of the VIAVI Observer Platform.

Anytime I see a presentation from a monitoring solution there are three questions that I ask:

“How useful would this be for tier one technicians?”

I usually consider that question from both the perspective of a NOC and also a helpdesk technician. If a monitoring tool isn’t practical for those roles, I am the one who gets stuck using it all of the time, and therefore, it has no place in my environment.

“How useful would this tool be for me?”

If the tool can’t offer enough information to be useful for a senior engineer, I don’t want to pay for it. It also increases the complexity of passing trouble tickets up the chain as each person has to start back at zero in their own tool.

“Does this make it easier to find the problem, or just add another step?”

Monitoring tools which only show up/down status and system logs have very little use for me. I can easily find those by other means, or on the device itself, faster than I can fire up a browser, click on a bookmark, log in, navigate through a device tree, etc.

VIAVI has provided the right answers to all three questions.

product-obsever-apex-welcome

The starting page for Observer is simple. It doesn’t take forever to load as it attempts to pull data from many different sources to provide a general health overview that rarely has anything to do with the reason you opened the application. Instead, Observer’s search box is ready for any relevant text the technician may know about the problem. If you have an IP, MAC address, VLAN, or hostname, those are all great places to start. You can also choose to push into a more generalized monitoring view like Application Performance, Network Performance, etc.

The search box is the beauty of the application for me. VIAVI indexes all of the monitoring sources for things like MAC addresses, IP addresses, interfaces, usernames, and other metadata and then correlates that information together. A technician doesn’t need to look up an IP address in the ARP table, get the MAC address, look up the MAC address in the MAC address table to get the port, then check the port for errors. A search on the IP address will provide all of that information, quickly! Since VIAVI also knows the assigned VLAN, it quickly displays “Here’s a bad actor on the same VLAN that is flooding the VLAN with bad frames.” The technicians can find problems without looking directly for them. That’s a huge win. This is not looking for a needle in a haystack. This is turning on an extremely powerful magnet and letting the needle come to you.

Another great feature is that Observer creates a baseline from the information that it acquires. With that baseline that understands system X typically runs at 75 percent utilization, but is now running at 90 percent, more problems quickly float to the surface. Additionally, the baseline filters out the normal abnormal. Is it “normal” for that system to run at 75 percent utilization all of the time? Maybe so. If it is, a technician doesn’t need a warning about it. It might be operating as designed.

If a technician can’t find a solution through the dashboard, the next engineer who picks up the problem will want to dig deeper. Thanks to the stored packet traces which provided all of the metadata the technician used, the engineer can take a look at the actual packets. Aside from the standard fields like source and destination, IP’s and ports, Observer also includes a patent-pending User Experience Score which is a 1-10 scale to aid in finding problems faster within the trace files.

Taking the click-through troubleshooting one step further, Observer creates Application Dependency Maps which aid an engineer to understand all of the dependent systems quickly and which are affecting performance.

When considering my initial three questions I proposed, I feel VIAVI’s Observer is providing pretty compelling answers for each. I look forward to learning more.

In many ways, Tech Field Day offers a similar solution to VIAVI Observer. TFD allows me to filter through the marketing hype, and get to the bottom of a product or solution and whether it will be useful to me. Don’t forget to check out the many other videos and content created by Tech Field Day at Cisco Live.

Arista announces acquisition of Mojo Networks

Today after the markets closed, Arista announced the acquisition of Mojo Networks. This is a very interesting development, and I am curious to see what Arista does with the technology.

You can read the press release here.

If you are asking “Who is Mojo Networks?” you clearly weren’t paying attention at MFD2 during the Mojo Networks presentation. Take a look at it here:

Mojo Presents at Mobility Field Day 2

You can see more at the Mobility Field Day 2 Event page:

http://techfieldday.com/appearance/mojo-networks-presents-at-mobility-field-day-2/

What do you think about this team up? Is this a good decision for Arista? How do you see it impacting the WiFi community?

Geek Tools – Ventev VenVolt

Any wireless engineer who has spent time completing AP-on-a-stick (APoS) surveys has probably used the Terrawave MIMO 802.3af POE battery. It was a heavy lead-acid battery in a metal case, which promised six hours of use before needing a recharge. Most days it did deliver 6 hours when powering an AP with a single radio enabled. However, I often found that if you ran both AP radios, it would regularly give you less; usually running right around 5 hours with a charge during a meal break.

Did I mention it was heavy? Travel through airports and the TSA was a lot of fun too!

Now, Ventev has a new battery, the VenVolt. It’s sleek, orange, and much lighter. The VenVolt has a bunch of new features which make this an essential addition to any wireless engineer’s toolkit.5132514

  • The battery is now a lithium iron phosphate. That’s the weight savings that makes this thing easy to take on the road. It also ensures plenty of power delivery when needed and long-term stability of that power. Additionally, LiFePO4 battery chemistry is known for higher cycle life and better stability, which should relieve any concerns of a Samsung Note 7 style battery fires.
  • Better power delivery allows the VenVolt to efficiently deliver 802.3at power; a requirement for 802.11ac access points.
  • If 802.3at power wasn’t enough, Ventev includes a three amp, 15 watt, USB power port. That port can be used to trickle charge a laptop, or it can power my favorite tool, an Odroid, which I always use when surveying.
  • That power port wouldn’t be nearly as exciting for me without the final major upgrade, ethernet passthrough.

There are lots of “little” updates that should be mentioned as well:

  • A single switch! No more guessing which switch combination was needed for charging.
  • An LCD screen that shows charge status, voltage, and gives you some guess of the available runtime.
  • The case is ruggedized and has been drop tested to ensure reliability.

Let’s talk through my “new normal” setup with the VenVolt. I connect the AP to the “802.3AF/AT Out” port. There is no difference between that and the old heavy battery.
Next, I connect an ethernet cable between the “Ethernet In” port on the VenVolt and the ethernet port on my Odroid.
Finally, I connect a micro-USB cable between the Odroid and the USB port on the front of the VenVolt.
The magic happens due to the flexibility of my Odroid. A few jobs it runs:

  • iPerf, HTTP, Ping endpoint for any throughput/active surveys that I need to run.
  • TFTP Server – This is where I host boot or firmware files for the many various AP’s that I might use for surveys.
  • DHCP/DNS Server – Makes it easy for the TFTP Updates, client connections, etc.
  • Encrypted File Storage – This is where I store backups of survey files, any building drawings that I am given, or any specifics that I might need at a location.

One final note. The VenVolt is labeled “MK1”. To me, this is a suggestion that updates will come in the future, rather than the “one-and-done” approach of the Terrawave Battery. While I’m excited to see what may come in MK2, this is an excellent upgrade and a definite requirement for anyone who spends time doing APoS surveys.

There was an excellent session at WLPC, where Ventev employees Dennis Burrell and Mike Parry, along with Sam Clements discussed the development process for the VenVolt. It’s worth watching:

Relevent Links:

Ventev VenVolt

Ventev Infrastructure

Ventev Infrastructure supplied me with a VenVolt for testing and provided me the ability to give feedback. All written content provided here is my personal opinion, and has not been manipulated in any way by Ventev. I appreciate all companies who welcome constructive feedback!