KRACK Attack Mitigation – A Call to Arms!

Ask any wireless engineer about the relationship with vendors who make the non-standard clients on their network and you’ll likely get a range of responses from quiet sobs to yelled expletives.

Problems ranging from bad driver or firmware updates, KRACKdevices which don’t follow the 802.11 standard, and long delays in problem resolution are all part of the experience.

Often we may say to a customer “These clients are causing problems and here is proof. You should look at replacing them.” While the vendor of those products are telling that same customer “Your network sucks!”

With that in mind, I want to consider a few things as we begin the KRACK Attack mitigation.

  • Check CERT’s Vulnerability Notes Database for the status of vendor updates. This is a pretty extensive list, and is worth following:
    CERT’s Vulnerability Database
  • Some vendors will be VERY slow to issue patches. It is absolutely essential that we as wireless engineers who have the ability to approve devices refuse any new client deployments without the appropriate patches.
    Bring the security team into the discussion, and ensure that as a united front, unpatched clients are refused!
    Those who work in a sales role should warn all customers away from vendors who are not actively communicating their patch strategy, with clearly defined release dates. We should not send money to any company that doesn’t see resolving this as one of their highest priorities. Those companies should wither and die.
  • Many large enterprises have specific budgets for IT security related expenditures. If the budget isn’t available from teams responsible for the devices, check with the security team. They may have a budget that can be utilized.
  • Communicate to the vendors this week. Ask about patching schedules for KRACK. Ask to be included in weekly updates on the status until patches are released. Make it very clear that you see this as a high priority and are not willing to accept a “Maybe, eventually” patch schedule.

As a group of wireless engineers, we cannot accept anything less than appropriate patches which clearly mitigate KRACK.

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